10 August 2019

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Intellectually, I know this isn't a problem.

Viscerally it freaks me out to see the rim outside the bolt head (red anodized snap cap shown) like this.

3 comments:

  1. Cut one of those 45 colt shells in half lenght ways. One of the strongest pistol cases. No more showing than in a colt single action. Dont worry, be happy - LOL danny

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    Replies
    1. My brain and my guts fight like this all the time. Most times the brain wins.

      Delete
  2. Yeah, I first looked at that and thought, WTF? But then I cogitated, and realized the implications verses reality. Basically, the rim is only there for ejection of the cartridge case. So now I'm wondering if rimless cases were designed to accommodate box mags, or some other thing . . .?
    So I looked and stole this from this web site:
    https://www.chuckhawks.com/early_metallic_cartridges.htm

    I attribute all credit to this information source. I'm just a parrot.

    The .30-30 is a rimmed cartridge, just like the black powder sporting cartridges that had preceded it. This is fine for a tubular magazine rifle such as the Model 94, but less satisfactory for a repeating rifle fed from a box magazine.

    The answer, of course, was the rimless cartridge. I am not sure about the first rimless rifle cartridge, but an early example and the trend setter for subsequent rimless rifle cartridges, was the 7.9x57mm J Mauser.

    The 7.9x57mm (.318" diameter bullet) was developed in 1888 for the German bolt action Model 88 Commission rifle. In 1898 that rifle was replaced in German service by the familiar Mauser Model 98, and in 1905 a spitzer bullet of slightly larger diameter (8mm or .323") was adopted using the same case. This cartridge was the famous 8x57JS, which became a world-wide hunting cartridge that is still popular to this day. 1892 had seen the introduction of the 7x57 Mauser cartridge, based on the same case necked down to accept 7mm bullets and also widely used to this day. These German cartridges established most of the critical parameters for the standard rimless cartridges that followed, including the basic rim diameter of .473" used for the .30-06, and .308 Winchester cartridge families and the majority of other subsequent (non-magnum) centerfire rifle cartridges.

    So, does that precede semi auto handguns?
    Go search for yourself. I'm going to look for another beer.

    Cheers,
    Sarthurk


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